Doomsayers claim the world will end tomorrow

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Rumors of another apocalyptic collision with the mythical planet Nibiru have been circulating the Internet.

Based on absolutely no scientific data at all, this latest incarnation of the Nibiru doomsday myth, which claims that the world will end tomorrow (September 23), has been making headlines this week.

Interest in Nibiru, which has been connected to various doomsday prophecies over the last two decades, began in 1995 after Nancy Lieder, founder of the website ZetaTalk, claimed that extraterrestrials from the Zeta Reticuli star system had warned her of an impending collision.

Since then there have been multiple 'doomsdays' involving Nibiru, but as evidenced by the fact that we are still here to talk about it, every single one of these has turned out to be bogus.

Tomorrow's alleged apocalypse is based on the occurrence of a rare celestial alignment that, according to some, happens to mirror signs from the Bible's Book of Revelation.




Unsurprisingly, NASA has been quick to dismiss the whole thing as nonsense.

"Various people are 'predicting' that world will end on September 23 when another planet collides with Earth," the space agency wrote. "The planet in question, Nibiru, doesn't exist, so there will be no collision. The story of Nibiru has been around for years (as has the 'days of darkness' tale) and is periodically recycled into new apocalyptic fables."

"Nibiru and other stories about wayward planets are an internet hoax. There is no factual basis for these claims. If Nibiru or Planet X were real and headed for an encounter with the Earth astronomers would have been tracking it for at least the past decade, and it would be visible by now to the naked eye. Obviously, it does not exist."